Sep 29 2009

Forgiven

Yesterday, while we were having lunch with Sanctus Real, we heard about the many, many, many people who have been sharing stories of who they have forgiven.  With each story, a tile is removed until finally we'll be able to see the entire painting by Erin Samuel Timm called Forgiven.  If you want to see the power of God in action, just read some of the storiesAnd maybe share your own.

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Sep 24 2009

Casting Crowns!

In case you missed Casting Crowns this morning, get to know them by watching this video about their new song/album "Until the Whole World Hears." 

 

Sep 23 2009

"See You at the Pole"

Students in Clinton KY (thanks to Facebook friend Kristia Peery Reynolds for the picture.)

A young man named Josiah began one of the greatest revivals and awakenings in the Old Testament. Josiah had become king of Israel at the age of 8. Scripture tells us that at the age of 16, he began to pursue God passionately. Like his forefather, David, he began to show signs of godliness early on and gained the respect of the people. 2 Kings 22:2 states, “He did what was right in the eyes of the Lord and walked in all the ways of his father, David, not turning aside to the right or to the left.”

This resulted in
radical obedience getting rid of everything that did not honor God and challenging everyone around him to do likewise. These actions resulted in a mighty move of God in his day — actually, one of the greatest ever!

Our theme verse for See you at the Pole™ comes from the heart of this story. Right after the newly discovered scriptures were read to Josiah, the Bible says, “When the king heard the words of the Book of the Law, he tore his robes.” In other words, his heart was pierced with conviction. (
Read the full story.)
King Josiah heard the words of God and proclaimed:

“Go and pray to God for me and for the people . . .“ —2 KINGS 22:13a (The Message)

syatp.org

Sep 22 2009

De-Stress Your Weeknights

If your evenings are a blur of stress and activity, here are 3 myths you may want to smash...

  • "I've got to get my evening chores done." Sure, there are times when there isn't a single clean sock in your house and you must do the laundry. But Debbie Mandel (author of Addicted to Stress) says many women pile on the tasks unnecessarily, just for the sake of checking off items on their to-do list. Instead, focus on connecting at the end of the day with family — and yourself. "Each night, move one of your usual tasks (paying bills, Swiffering the kitchen floor) to the A.M., when you're clearheaded — even if it means getting up 15 minutes earlier," advises Mandel. Or reslate them for the weekend, lunch hour...whenever you can nab five minutes.
  • "I must multitask to survive." The human brain literally cannot do two things at once, says Sandra Bod Chapman, Ph.D., chief director of the University of Texas at Dallas Center for Brain Health. "It quickly toggles back and forth from one task to the other, taking its toll on our efficiency," she notes. Some multitasking is fine — chatting with the kids while chopping onions, for instance — but for more involved tasks, Chapman recommends asking yourself, "Does this require my full attention?" If the answer is yes, either focus on that job or save it for later. You'll actually conserve time, she adds, because doing chores sequentially is proven to be faster than running back and forth between them.
  • "Electronics ease my stress." Actually, the opposite is true: Paying too much attention to the TV, computer, or BlackBerry adds to your anxiety levels and distracts you from family, says Chapman. To remind yourself to unplug, write out a "Stop!" list for the hectic pre-dinner hours, she suggests. "It might include 'Stop answering e-mail after 5:15 p.m.' or 'Stop talking on the cell phone when picking up the kids,' or 'Stop playing Bejeweled once everyone gets home.'" Enforce these policies family-wide, as Janet Schofield did recently after she noticed her 15-year-old son, Zack, texting under the table. "That's when dinner became an electronics-free zone," says the Beaver Falls, PA, mom. "We actually have conversations at dinner now — and the evenings feel a lot more peaceful."

All these tips are from Good Houskeeping.  Click here to read the whole article, then say a little prayer and dive in to restructuring your evening so you can enjoy the sweet spot of your day with the people you love the most.  ~blessings and k-love, Lisa