Aug 16 2010

Welcome Elianah Joy! Baby K-LOVE is Here!

Over a week past her due date, Elianah Joy Wright is finally here!  Praise God!!  Congratulations to K-LOVE Morning Show Producer KC and his wife Jessica on their brand new baby girl!

 

Aug 10 2010

Transitioning From Summer to School with Dr. Michele Borba

Before she sits in on The Today Show this week, parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba joined us this morning with advice for parents on how to help your kids transition from Summer to School ...

1.     Listen to your child’s school worries. Identify your child back-to-school worries and create simple solutions to reduce those you can. Most typical back to school worries involve these issues: “Will I be safe (and not get lost or get on the wrong bus)?” “Will I fit in (and be accepted by the other kids and find friends)?” “Will I be capable (and able to do the work)?” “Will the teacher be nice (and not yell or be too hard)?”  “Will Mommy come back?”

 

·      Learn the lay of the land. Boosting your child’s comfort zone about a new location helps reduce jitters. Take a tour of the school, check it out online or even print out a map and schedule

 

·      Don’t over-hype the school! “What a gorgeous campus!” or “You’re going to be soooooo happy here!” type of comments don’t ease jitters. In fact, they can backfire and cause more anxiety. So don’t build up false expectations so much as to disappoint your child if things fall short of your build-up. Keep your excitement to yourself.

 

3.     Find a buddy. Knowing just one classmate can minimize first day jitters so help your kid learn the name of at least one peer. The two kids don’t have to become soul mates –just acquaintances!  

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4.     Prepare for separation. Rehearsing a goodbye can help a younger or more sensitive child feel more secure when the big moment really comes. Doing so also helps reduce anxiety so the child knows what to expect. Ease the back to school fears by slowly stretching your child’s “security” levels. Slowly increase the number of caregivers to second circle (teacher, friends) and finally outer circle (strangers). Gradually stretch separation times. Find people your child trusts—a babysitter, relative, or friends to be watch your child. Then “come and go” to help your child build confidence, recognize he can survive without you and you do come back.

 

5.     Create a special goodbye. Practice a special private “goodbye” just between the two of you like a secret handshake or special kiss to help your child start to pull away. Then tell him you’ll be using that same goodbye each time you drop him off. Here are a few ways to make goodbyes smoother and less stressful for both of you.   

 

6.     Teach coping skills. Studies at the University of Minnesota found that when kids feel they have some control over what’s happening, anxieties decrease and smooth the transition. Here are worry reducers to practice with your child.

 

·      Teach:Talk back to the worry.” Researchers at the University of McGuill found that teaching a child to “talk to back to the fear” helps reduce anxiety. The child so she feels she is in charge of the worry and not the other way around. The trick is to have your child practice telling herself she’ll be okay to build up confidence. For a younger child: “Go away worry, leave me alone. Mommy will come back.”  For an older child: “I won’t let the worry get me. I can handle this.”

 

·      Point him to “The first thing.” Not knowing what to do or where to go upon arriving at a new scene increases anxiety. So offer “first thing” suggestions. For a young child: Pointing her towards an activity she enjoys—like a puzzle or blocks. For an older child: Suggest he go to the basketball court that he enjoys or meet up with that acquaintance he met at the park near the water fountain.

 

7.     Say goodbye and don’t linger. A kid’s anxiety increases if you make too big of a deal about leaving or draw out the goodbye. The key is to establish a consistent pattern of goodbye so your child knows what ritual to expect, realizes she can make it through the time apart and that you really will return.

 

8.   

      Be patient but know when to worry. Adjustment may take from a day to several weeks, so be patient. For most kids separation anxieties are normal and pass. The key is to watch for a gradual increase in confidence and a diminishment of school and separation worries. If the anxiety continue or increase, check in with the teacher or counselor to see if they have suggestions to help your child adjust.

Aug 03 2010

Learn to Swim ... Water Safety Tips

Click here to read the story of six teenagers who lost their life in the Red River on Monday.  And remind yourself of the importance of (1) knowing how to swim and (2) knowing how to be safe around water, especially with children.

Make Water Safety Your Priority

  • Swim in designated areas supervised by lifeguards.
  • Always swim with a buddy; do not allow anyone to swim alone. Even at a public pool or a lifeguarded beach, use the buddy system!
  • Ensure that everyone in the family learns to swim well. Enroll in age-appropriate Red Cross water orientation and Learn-to-Swim courses.
  • Never leave a young child unattended near water and do not trust a child’s life to another child; teach children to always ask permission to go near water.
  • Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.
  • Establish rules for your family and enforce them without fail. For example, set limits based on each person’s ability, do not let anyone play around drains and suction fittings, and do not allow swimmers to hyperventilate before swimming under water or have breath-holding contests.
  • Even if you do not plan on swimming, be cautious around natural bodies of water including ocean shoreline, rivers and lakes. Cold temperatures, currents and underwater hazards can make a fall into these bodies of water dangerous.
  • If you go boating, wear a life jacket! Most boating fatalities occur from drowning.
  • Avoid alcohol use. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination; affects swimming and diving skills; and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

Prevent Unsupervised Access to the Water

  • Install and use barriers around your home pool or hot tub. Safety covers and pool alarms should be added as additional layers of protection.
  • Ensure that pool barriers enclose the entire pool area, are at least 4-feet high with gates that are self-closing, self-latching and open outward, and away from the pool. The latch should be high enough to be out of a small child’s reach.
  • If you have an above-ground or inflatable pool, remove access ladders and secure the safety cover whenever the pool is not in use.
  • Remove any structures that provide access to the pool, such as outdoor furniture, climbable trees, decorative walls and playground equipment.
  • Keep toys that are not in use away from the pool and out of sight. Toys can attract young children to the pool.

Maintain Constant Supervision

  • Actively supervise children whenever around the water—even if lifeguards are present. Do not just drop your kids off at the public pool or leave them at the beach—designate a responsible adult to supervise.
  • Always stay within arm’s reach of young children and avoid distractions when supervising children around water.

Know What to Do in an Emergency

  • If a child is missing, check the water first. Seconds count in preventing death or disability.
  • Know how and when to call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number.
  • If you own a home pool or hot tub, have appropriate equipment, such as reaching or throwing equipment, a cell phone, life jackets and a first aid kit.
  • Enroll in Red Cross home pool safety, water safety, first aid and CPR/AED courses to learn how to prevent and respond to emergencies.
Jul 27 2010

Draven Sings from the Heart

Draven has autism and is mostly non-verbal.  But his mom Nakai captured him singing praises to God along with Phillips, Craig and Dean and The Revelation Song on K-LOVE.  Click here to add your comments to the hundreds on Facebook.