Aug 10 2010

Transitioning From Summer to School with Dr. Michele Borba

Before she sits in on The Today Show this week, parenting expert Dr. Michele Borba joined us this morning with advice for parents on how to help your kids transition from Summer to School ...

1.     Listen to your child’s school worries. Identify your child back-to-school worries and create simple solutions to reduce those you can. Most typical back to school worries involve these issues: “Will I be safe (and not get lost or get on the wrong bus)?” “Will I fit in (and be accepted by the other kids and find friends)?” “Will I be capable (and able to do the work)?” “Will the teacher be nice (and not yell or be too hard)?”  “Will Mommy come back?”

 

·      Learn the lay of the land. Boosting your child’s comfort zone about a new location helps reduce jitters. Take a tour of the school, check it out online or even print out a map and schedule

 

·      Don’t over-hype the school! “What a gorgeous campus!” or “You’re going to be soooooo happy here!” type of comments don’t ease jitters. In fact, they can backfire and cause more anxiety. So don’t build up false expectations so much as to disappoint your child if things fall short of your build-up. Keep your excitement to yourself.

 

3.     Find a buddy. Knowing just one classmate can minimize first day jitters so help your kid learn the name of at least one peer. The two kids don’t have to become soul mates –just acquaintances!  

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4.     Prepare for separation. Rehearsing a goodbye can help a younger or more sensitive child feel more secure when the big moment really comes. Doing so also helps reduce anxiety so the child knows what to expect. Ease the back to school fears by slowly stretching your child’s “security” levels. Slowly increase the number of caregivers to second circle (teacher, friends) and finally outer circle (strangers). Gradually stretch separation times. Find people your child trusts—a babysitter, relative, or friends to be watch your child. Then “come and go” to help your child build confidence, recognize he can survive without you and you do come back.

 

5.     Create a special goodbye. Practice a special private “goodbye” just between the two of you like a secret handshake or special kiss to help your child start to pull away. Then tell him you’ll be using that same goodbye each time you drop him off. Here are a few ways to make goodbyes smoother and less stressful for both of you.   

 

6.     Teach coping skills. Studies at the University of Minnesota found that when kids feel they have some control over what’s happening, anxieties decrease and smooth the transition. Here are worry reducers to practice with your child.

 

·      Teach:Talk back to the worry.” Researchers at the University of McGuill found that teaching a child to “talk to back to the fear” helps reduce anxiety. The child so she feels she is in charge of the worry and not the other way around. The trick is to have your child practice telling herself she’ll be okay to build up confidence. For a younger child: “Go away worry, leave me alone. Mommy will come back.”  For an older child: “I won’t let the worry get me. I can handle this.”

 

·      Point him to “The first thing.” Not knowing what to do or where to go upon arriving at a new scene increases anxiety. So offer “first thing” suggestions. For a young child: Pointing her towards an activity she enjoys—like a puzzle or blocks. For an older child: Suggest he go to the basketball court that he enjoys or meet up with that acquaintance he met at the park near the water fountain.

 

7.     Say goodbye and don’t linger. A kid’s anxiety increases if you make too big of a deal about leaving or draw out the goodbye. The key is to establish a consistent pattern of goodbye so your child knows what ritual to expect, realizes she can make it through the time apart and that you really will return.

 

8.   

      Be patient but know when to worry. Adjustment may take from a day to several weeks, so be patient. For most kids separation anxieties are normal and pass. The key is to watch for a gradual increase in confidence and a diminishment of school and separation worries. If the anxiety continue or increase, check in with the teacher or counselor to see if they have suggestions to help your child adjust.

Aug 10 2010

Family Fun with Guy Fieri ... Minute to Win It

He's that guy with crazy, spikey blond hair on all those cooking shows - Guy Fieri!  We chat with Guy this morning about his latest show "Minute to Win It".  A show that not is only fun to watch with your family, but you can learn some crazy fun games to play with your kids and friends.

  

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Aug 09 2010

Tony Dungy - Being a Mentor Leader

If you missed our chat with Tony Dungy, listen to highlights through the links below ...

His book "The Mentor Leader"

Fearful and intimidated by being a mentor?

True leadership & the need for mentors

Tony's advice for coaches, plus his pick to win the Super Bowl

Tony Dungy is one of three men in the history of the National Football League to win a Super Bowl as a player and as a head coach.  But beyond his accolades on the field, Tony has probably made his biggest impact through his unwavering commitment to Christ and desire to help others.  Tony joined us this morning to discuss one of his passions - being a mentor leader.  To learn more about Tony and is latest book "The Mentor Leader", check out this link.

 Here's Tony with Eric's family

Aug 08 2010

God of this city: Indianapolis!

Downtown Indianapolis, Sunday morning August 8th, thousands of Christians worshiping together!

Thank you to everyone who worked to make Worship in the City so amazing and God honoring.  For city blocks you could hear Jesus being praised.  Some of the music was urban gospel, some was southern gospel, and some of the music was modern rock worship.  Several pastors shared their hearts.  It was BEAUTIFUL to see the Body of Christ together, outside, in unity, and motivated to serve Indianapolis.  When the Aaron Pelsue Band began sing "God of this City" with downtown Indy as the backdrop, it was moving, precious, anointed, and so right.

What is going to happen in America if the church joins together to love our cities like NEVER before, in an UNPRECEDENTED move of unity and love under the banner of Jesus Christ?  The very best is yet to come.  I'm praying God will show me what my role is, show you what your role is, and that we will all have the courage to do what He calls us to do.

The time has come to love and to live what we've learned.

in Christ - Lisa